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What is cervical spondylolythesis?



Cervical spondylolythesis is when a vertebra in the neck slips forwards ahead of the vertebra beneath it. The effect of this can range from causing no problems at all to causing significant symptoms.


Passive stretch applied to trapezius muscle by therapistAbove: Passive stretch applied to trapezius muscle by therapist



What causes cervical spondylolythesis?



Cervical spondylolythesis can be the result of several causes including:
  • Genetic predisposition
  • Degenerative changes
  • Trauma from an injury
  • Bone disease




Soft tissue massage of the muscles and connective tissues of the neckAbove: Soft tissue massage of the muscles and connective tissues of the neck



What are the symptoms of cervical spondylolythesis?



Cervical spondylolythesis can cause symptoms such as:
  • Reduced range of movement
  • Pain
  • Numbness / Pins and needles
  • Weakness of neck muscles

Physiotherapy for cervical spondylolythesis



Physiotherapy can be very important in treating cervical spondylolythesis. At Physio.co.uk our specialised physiotherapists treat each patient as an individual, aim to prevent symptoms and teach self management. Treatment may include:
  • Advice on pain relief
  • Bracing
  • Stretching exercises
  • Strengthening exercises
  • Manipulation




Experienced Physiotherapist conducting an assessment of the cervical spine, muscles and connective tissues in the neckAbove: Experienced Physiotherapist conducting an assessment of the cervical spine, muscles and connective tissues in the neck



Can cervical spondylolythesis cause any long-term effects?



Physiotherapy can effectively treat cervical spondylolythesis in the majority of cases, especially for younger people. If physiotherapy is not effective then surgery is an option that can be used to treat the problem. Physiotherapy would then be used in rehabilitation.




Stretches and mobilisations of the cerival spine, muscle and connective tissues in the neckAbove: Stretches and mobilisations of the cerival spine, muscle and connective tissues in the neck



To arrange an assessment with Physio.co.uk please contact us or call 0330 088 7800.